RESEARCH ARTICLE


Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria Isolated from Water Supplies Used in Poultry Production in Ashanti Region of Ghana



Frank B. Osei1, Vivian E. Boamah1, Yaw D. Boakye1, Christian Agyare1, *, Robert C. Abaidoo2
1 Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
2 Department of Theoretical and Applied Biology, Faculty of Bioscience, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana


Article Metrics

CrossRef Citations:
1
Total Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 836
Abstract HTML Views: 463
PDF Downloads: 143
Total Views/Downloads: 1442
Unique Statistics:

Full-Text HTML Views: 550
Abstract HTML Views: 176
PDF Downloads: 134
Total Views/Downloads: 860



Creative Commons License
© 2021 Osei et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana; Tel: 233246369803; E-mail: cagyare.pharm@knust.edu.gh; chrisagyare@yahoo.com


Abstract

Objective:

Water plays an important role in both domestic and commercial settings. Pathogenic microbial contaminants, however, render water unsafe for use. There are several reports on the quality of water used for drinking purposes in humans but few studies have been conducted on the microbial quality of water used in animal farming.

Methods:

In this study, the resistance pattern of bacterial isolates from drinking water used in poultry production in the Ashanti region of Ghana from our previously published report was determined. The presence of Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci was determined using selective culture media (pour plate method) and confirmed through Gram staining and biochemical reactions. Antibiotic sensitivity of isolates was determined followed by detection of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) producing Gram-negative isolates.

Results:

The study revealed that water used in poultry farms contains sources of multi-drug resistant strains of E. coli, S. typhi, S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. E. coli, S. typhi, S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci were recovered from 31%, 36%, 64% and 19% of samples, respectively. Majority of these isolates were resistant to cephalosporins and penicillins. Almost 95% of the bacterial isolates were multi-drug resistant. None of E. coli and S. typhi isolates produced ESBL.

Conclusion:

There is a need for stringent regulations and stringent measures should be taken to make these various sources of water safe for use in animal husbandry as these waters are a potential source of pathogenic and resistant bacterial strains which can cause infections to the animals and farm workers.

Keywords: Antibiotic resistance, Water samples, Antibiotics, Bacterial isolates, Pathogenic bacterial poultry, E. coli, S. typhi, S. aureus.