RESEARCH ARTICLE


The Study of Genetic Relationship Among Third Generation Cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella enterica Strains by ERIC-PCR



Reza Ranjbar1, Ali Naghoni1, Soheila Yousefi2, Ali Ahmadi1, *, Nematollah Jonaidi3, Yunes Panahi4
1 Molecular Biology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Department of Biochemistry, Payam Noor University, Tehran, Iran
3 Health Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 Chemical Injuries Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran


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© Ranjbar et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Molecular Biology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Tel: +98-21-88039883; Fax: +98-21-88039883; E-mail: aliahmadi1345@gmail.com


Abstract

Background and Objectives:

Salmonella is an important food-borne pathogen responsible for disease in humans and animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic relationship among third generation cephalosporin-resistant Salmonella enterica strains by Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC)-PCR.

Methods:

The study included all Salmonella isolates obtained from clinical cases in a pediatric hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2006 to 2009. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The genetic relationship between third generation cephalosporins-resistant Salmonella enterica strains was determined using ERIC-PCR.

Results:

Of 136 Salmonella enterica isolates recovered from pediatric patients, six isolates including four Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis and two Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis showed an extended-spectrum cephalosporins resistant phenotype. ERIC-PCR differentiated Salmonella enterica serotypes Infantis and Enteritidis into 2 distinct clusters arbitrarily named as E1 and E2. Profile E1 was found in two Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis isolates, and profile E2 was found in four Salmonella enterica serotype Infantis isolates.

Conclusion:

Extended-spectrum cephalosporins resistant Salmonella could be attributed to a few predominant serotypes including Enteritidis and Infantis in this study. Genetic analysis using ERIC-PCR showed that closely related clones are responsible for the occurrence of extended-spectrum cephalosporins resistant Salmonella infection in Tehran.

Keywords: : Salmonella enterica, Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus, Antimicrobial susceptibility testing.